Murder of Crows

Image by Tracey Grumbach

Sunrise, sunsets.
Life slips through our fingers
as we swim through its mist of days
sometimes without allowing
its touch or, touching.

But they,
they fly so high.

Never really liked crows
until I knew that they
loved, too.
That they mate for life and
even care for their young
when they’re old enough
and, needn’t.

Their calls echo
in my longing.

So high.
I cannot count the miles
yet,
so close to my dreams.

A blessed moment of the sublime
awakens sleeping flames.

Turning circles
they entice.
Seduce with sensual dance.

Their joy
their freedom to belong
as one small part of
earths magic
So lost in their play
I yearn once more
to share their bliss of flight
through
feathers in the wind.

~*~

© Daydreamertoo                *All rights reserved

I never really liked crows, always thought they were bullies, then I discovered that a whole bunch of them is called ‘A murder of crows’ and was intrigued by that. We had a whole murder load of them right outside the back of our house in 2009. It was so loud, almost deafening, because there were so many gathered in the woods. I only caught a part of them flying away on the video clip but, there had to be a couple of hundred all told. It reminded me of the Alfred Hitchcock movie ‘The Birds’ because there were so many. I then went online to read up on them, to discover that crows mate for life. Just like swans and some other birds remaining with only one partner. And, not only but also, they care for their young until well after they can fly by themselves. They watch over them, protect them and continue to teach them.

My view of these birds changed dramatically once I knew they weren’t all about just being bullies and I found a respect for them that wasn’t there before.

Shared with dVerse Poets Poetics: With the photography by Tracy Grumbach of Nine Acres Designs

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Author: Daydreamer

I live on a beautiful island in Atlantic Canada and design custom made candles

24 thoughts on “Murder of Crows”

  1. A whole new way of looking at them, for sure. They don’t have the best reptutation but as living beings they too give new life. I like how you’ve done your site now. Easier to comment and to add a “like” to your post!

  2. I loved the lesson on crows and your beautiful interpretation of my image. I, myself, find them a fascinating creature to photograph in flight…so content to glide in their element. And quite the social creature too, often cawing and interacting with each other.

  3. Hi I’m Eve, I found you through DVerse. 🙂

    I’m a big crow lover! I think ‘A murder of crows’ is a fantastic phrase, and I’m glad that you look on them in a better light now! I feel like people dislike magpies for similar reasons, and yes, they don’t have the nicest of nesting habits, but they’re beautiful nonetheless~

    I think you’ve captured the loving nature of crows in your poem, it’s great!

      1. Hello! I’m glad you managed to find it! I was wondering if you could tell me in detail the trouble you had? I’ve had a couple of people mention this, but others seem to have no problem… obviously I want commenting to work for everybody. 🙂

        If you could help, that would be great. You can use my Guestbook if you wish!

        Also, lovely to meet you, thank you for commenting on my poem!

        Eve x

  4. Very interesting! I had a similar inclination, a colored view of a nuisance. But now that you’ve said, it a partner for life and love for their young! No wonder they have been loud up in the trees. Wonder how man can be or emulate them, their virtues I mean! Great write!

    Hank

  5. I had a crow when I was a teenager, Charlie was his name … He travelled all over with me … From Danmak to Greece and back … he lived to be 12 years … he is still with me in spirit … Love, cat.

  6. For me the opening stanza is the crowning glory of this poem – I enjoyed the segue to crows as well – I must confess I have always been very drawn to crows.

  7. I like your sentiments and that you latch into our deep desire for flight. It seems that the less we know the easier it is to disconnect from the world around us. Thank you for the edification and compassion. We need so much more of both.

  8. I like these lines:

    “Their calls echo in my longing.”
    “the sublime awakens sleeping flames”

  9. Beautiful, kiddo……especially “to share their bliss of flight through feathers in the wind”……love the video. I remember my ex and I watching The Birds way back in the days of the dinosaurs….and next morning when we looked out, hundreds of crows were lined up along the telegraph lines………..

  10. I like corvines; they seem to have an awareness. Crows can be very playful and mischievous, just fun to watch. Very nice opening and then on the crows, to their free spirit ways.

  11. Well they are a pest and get into garbage cans but yeah they are more than bullies too. Each number has a name for it if I recall correctly. But a murder of crows I learned through the movie by the same name.

  12. that is pretty cool on their mating…most times i see them they are together or with another…i do envy their flying you know…really wish i could at times….

  13. They have a huge vocabulary. They use objects as tools. They are unbelievably smart and their ecosystem like so many others is being destroyed by man. They are almost as crucial to our survival as bees. We must not lose them. They are most important and extremely valuable, besides being beautiful birds to watch and learn from.

    Love your poetic exposition.

  14. I didn’t know they mated for life either. I have to admire their fortitude and how they adapt to different environments and how adept they are at making their voices heard. There is a place for every living thing..even crows! I enjoyed your poem and the lesson, Bren.

  15. wow…thanks for the little lesson on crows..didn’t know this…and i like how you wove this into your write as well… esp. touched by the last stanza…the joy, being part of the earth’s magic and the yearning to fly with them…nice…felt

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