Oliver Twist

 

Early morning sunlight was slowly burning off a fog which had ransacked the night, leaving glass windows weeping in its wake. A few ill dressed folk awaited some shop owners arrivals, perhaps hoping for an interview as heavily laden barrows were pushed back into their regular spaces and readied once more to do trade. Customers soon arrived, the well-to-do chatting in confidential whispers as store keepers and barrow boys began touting their wares.
It was still such a blur to the frightened young lad who’d gulped upon seeing a glued paper sticker poster on the wall of a copper with truncheon raised chasing after a thief, but with visions of a good belt ’round his ear if he didn’t find a pocket or two to pick, he focused on the older boy beside him who was already bringing all his fake charms into pick-pocketing play.

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As we just celebrated the 200th birthday of author Charles Dickens I thought I would try and do a Sunday Whirl wordle with him in mind.
So, for those who don’t already know it, this is my little bit of a make-believe interpretation from a scene from the story of Oliver Twist or, ‘The Parish boys Progress as it was originally called in 1837. It was Dickens 2nd novel published under his  pseudonym, “Boz”
This story has been turned into big screen movies several times and even a very good musical movie too.

Shared with The Sunday Whirl #43

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Author: Daydreamer

I live on a beautiful island in Atlantic Canada and design custom made candles

13 thoughts on “Oliver Twist”

  1. Great celebration indeed, here at your feed and yep seen this one. They liked saying Oliver 50 thousand times at the first didn’t they?..haha

  2. Very nice! You are so clever putting these words into summaries of novels or movies. And Happy Birthday, Charles Dickens. Where or where did the years go? (LOL)

  3. Bren, I love how you have celebrated Dickens here. Oliver is one of my all time favourite stories. Have you seen the remake by Polanski?

    Pamela

  4. It amazes me how popular Dickens remains. The characters he created are timeless. Thank you for bringing some of them to life this week. The first sentence is my favorite. Strong imagery.

  5. I like how you honored Dickens with those wordle words; they work so well for that time and place. I really like the fog “leaving glass windows weeping in its wake.”

    Richard

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